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PARP Inhibitors for Cancer Therapy
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Main description:

PARP Inhibitors for Cancer Therapy provides a comprehensive overview of the role of PARP in cancer therapy. The volume covers the history of the discovery of PARP (poly ADP ribose polymerase) and its role in DNA repair. In addition, a description of discovery of the PARP family, and other DNA maintenance-associated PARPs will also be discussed. The volume also features a section on accessible chemistry behind the development of inhibitors.

PARP inhibitors are a group of pharmacological inhibitors that are a particularly good target for cancer therapy. PARP plays a pivotal role in DNA repair and may contribute to the therapeutic resistance to DNA damaging agents used to treat cancer. Researchers have learned a tremendous amount about the biology of PARP and how tumour-specific defects in DNA repair can be exploited by PARPi. The “synthetic lethality” of PARPi is an exciting concept for cancer therapy and has led to a heightened activity in this area.


Feature:

Includes the most up-to-date research on PARP inhibitors and their effects on cancer therapy

Gives a comprehensive review of the history of PARP, including the discovery of the PARP family

Includes a section on accessible drug chemistry behind the development of inhibitors​


Back cover:

PARP Inhibitors for Cancer Therapy provides a comprehensive overview of the role of PARP—poly ADP ribose polymerase—in cancer therapy. The volume covers the history of the discovery of PARP and its role in DNA repair. Additionally, it describes the discovery of the PARP family, and includes a discussion of other DNA maintenance-associated PARPs. As well, the volume features a section on the accessible chemistry behind the development of inhibitors.

PARP inhibitors—PARPi—are a group of pharmacological inhibitors that are particularly good targets for cancer therapy. PARP plays a pivotal role in DNA repair and may contribute to the therapeutic resistance to DNA-damaging agents used to treat cancer. Researchers have learned a great deal about the biology of PARP and how tumor-specific defects in DNA repair can be exploited by PARPi. The “synthetic lethality” of PARPi is an exciting concept for cancer therapy, and has led to heightened activity in this area.


Contents:

Section 1: What PARP is and What it Does            

1.       History of the discovery of poly (ADP-ribose)

Takashi Sugimura and Sydney Shall

2.       Discovery of the PARP superfamily and focus on the lesser exhibited but not lesser talented members

Eléa Héberlé, Jean-Christophe Amé, Giuditta Illuzzi, Françoise Dantzer, Valérie Schreiber

3.       The role of PARPs in DNA Strand Break Repair

Stuart L. Rulten, Françoise Dantzer and Keith W. Caldecott

4.       TIPs: Tankyrase Interacting Proteins

Susan Smith

5.       PARP and Carcinogenesis

Junhui Wang, Akira Sato, Hiroaki Fujimori, Yoshio Miki, Mitsuko Masutani

6.       Multitasking roles for poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation in aging and longevity

Aswin Mangerich and Alexander Bürkle

Section 2. NAD catalysis and the identification of inhibitors          

7.       Overview of PARP Inhibitor Design and Optimization

Dana Ferraris

8.       Structure Based Design of PARP Inhibitors          

Stacie S. Canan

Section 3. Chemo- and radiosensitisation in vitro and in vivo       

9.       Preclinical chemosensitization by PARP inhibitors

David R. Shalinsky, Cherrie K. Donawho. Gerrit Los, and Joanne P. Palma

10.   Classification of PARP inhibitors based on PARP trapping and catalytic inhibition, and rationale for combinations with topoisomerase I inhibitors and alkylating agents

Junko Murai and Yves Pommier

11.   Radiosensitisation by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibition

Charles Fouillade, Alexis Fouquin, Mohammed-Tayyib Boudra, Vincent Favaudon, Vincent Pennaneach, Janet Hall

12.   The vasoactivity of PARP inhibitors

Cian M. McCrudden and Kaye J. Williams

Section 4. Synthetic lethality      

13.   Synthetic lethality with Homologous Recombination Repair defects

Helen E. Bryant, Sydney Shall

14.   Targeting tumour hypoxia with PARP Inhibitors: Contextual synthetic lethality

Katarzyna B. Leszczynska, Nadya Temper, Robert G. Bristow and Ester M. Hammond

15.   Other determinants of sensitivity            

Naoyuki Okita and Atsushi Shibata

16.   Synthetic sickness with molecularly targeted agents against the EGFR pathway

Jennifer A. Stanley and Eddy S Yang

17.   Disruption of DNA repair by cell cycle and transcriptional CDK inhibition

Liam Cornell, Neil Johnson and Geoffrey I. Shapiro

18.   Resistance to PARP Inhibitors Mediated by Secondary BRCA1/2 Mutations

Kiranjit K. Dhillon and Toshiyasu Taniguchi

 

19.   PARP inhibitor resistance - what is beyond BRCA1 or BRCA2 restoration

Guotai Xu, Jos Jonkers, Sven Rottenberg

Section 5. Clinical status               

20.   Introduction to PARPi clinical trials and future directions

Ruth Plummer and Yvette Drew

21.   Clinical trials investigating PARP inhibitors as single agents

Sheeba Irshad and Andrew Tutt

22.   Clinical trials of PARP inhibitors with chemotherapy

Ashley K. Clift, Nicholas Coupe and Mark R. Middleton

23.   Combination of PARP inhibitors with clinical radiotherapy

Ross Carruthers, Anthony J. Chalmers

24.   Biomarkers for PARP Inhibitors

C. Dearman, Ricky A. Sharma, Nicola Curtin


PRODUCT DETAILS

ISBN-13: 9783319141503
Publisher: Springer (Springer International Publishing)
Publication date: June, 2015
Pages: 562
Weight: 1075g
Availability: POD
Subcategories: General Issues, Oncology, Pharmacology

MEET THE AUTHOR

Nicola Jane Curtin, Ph.D. is Professor of Experimental Cancer Therapeutics at Newcastle University. Dr. Curtin is also the team leader for DNA damage signalling and repair projects within CR-UK Drug Development Programme.

Ricky Sharma is Associate Professor at the University of Oxford and Honorary Consultant in Clinical Oncology at the Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust. He graduated in medicine from the University of Cambridge, and subsequently trained in toxicology, general internal medicine, medical oncology and clinical oncology in Cambridge, Glasgow, Leicester and London. Since 2006, he has led a translational research group at the University of Oxford focussed on DNA damage repair and the development of new chemotherapy and radiotherapy treatments for cancer.

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