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Oxford Handbook of Medical Dermatology
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Main description:

Although skin conditions are common and affect people of all ages, little time is available for dermatology in the undergraduate curriculum. Junior doctors feel unprepared when faced with patients with skin conditions and most are unsure how to reach a diagnosis or plan management. The Oxford Handbook of Medical Dermatology provides accessible and practical advice that meets the needs of healthcare professionals working in hospitals. It will also be of value to those
working in the community, and to medical students.
This book focuses on medical rather than surgical dermatology. Illustrated and in full colour, it covers the common skin conditions seen in all branches of medicine, the cutaneous signs of systemic disease, and the art of making a diagnosis. The problem-based approach and the pocket-size make the book an invaluable bedside tool. Readers are led through the necessary steps in order to reach a diagnosis at the bedside.
Chronic skin diseases are disabling and embarrassing. This handbook promotes a patient-centred approach and good communication, and clinicians are encouraged to use simple quality of life measures to evaluate the impact of skin conditions on the patient.


PRODUCT DETAILS

ISBN-13: 9780199558322
Publisher: Oxford University Press (OUP Oxford)
Publication date: December, 2010
Pages: 640
Dimensions: 113.00 x 182.00 x 24.70
Weight: 324g
Availability: Available
Subcategories: Dermatology, Geriatrics, Immunology, Oncology, Paediatrics and Neonatal
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CUSTOMER REVIEWS

Average Rating 

Well designed ... portable and provides the basic foundation for diagnosing skin diseases ... Medical students will find this handbook useful. It is reasonably priced and offers a logical framework for deciphering and managing what can be a puzzling task for the nondermatologist confronted with a patient with an obvious skin disorder.