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Published December, 2017
By Lisa Nicole Mills
Publisher: McGill-Queen's University Press
Rating:

in-stock
When the United Nations announced the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) in 2000, approximately half a million women worldwide died each year from complications associated with pregnancy and childbirth. The fifth MDG aimed to reduce the maternal mortality rate by 75 per cent between 1990 and 2015, but by the target date, the goal had not been reached. In The Limits of Trust Lisa Nicole Mills investigates the reasons why Mexico in particular did not meet its objective. Focusing on the states of Guerrero, Chiapas, and Oaxaca, where maternal mortality rates are the highest in the country, Mills looks into how MDG 5 has been implemented in Mexico, how it has been experienced by individuals and groups, what obstacles have been encountered, and what factors have facilitated improvements in maternal health. Using data gathered from interviews with NGOs, government officials, and health care workers, the book argues that government and feminist NGO efforts to build trust in the health care system have fallen short because of systemic failures to protect women's rights and enhance the quality of health care. In Mexico a woman's risk of dying from a pregnancy-related complication is five times higher than in developed countries. The Limits of Trust explores the realities of implementing maternal health initiatives on the ground in rural, remote, and impoverished areas, and the steps that can be taken to successfully combat maternal mortality.

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£28.99
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Published December, 2017
By Lisa Nicole Mills
Publisher: McGill-Queen's University Press
Rating:

in-stock
When the United Nations announced the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) in 2000, approximately half a million women worldwide died each year from complications associated with pregnancy and childbirth. The fifth MDG aimed to reduce the maternal mortality rate by 75 per cent between 1990 and 2015, but by the target date, the goal had not been reached. In The Limits of Trust Lisa Nicole Mills investigates the reasons why Mexico in particular did not meet its objective. Focusing on the states of Guerrero, Chiapas, and Oaxaca, where maternal mortality rates are the highest in the country, Mills looks into how MDG 5 has been implemented in Mexico, how it has been experienced by individuals and groups, what obstacles have been encountered, and what factors have facilitated improvements in maternal health. Using data gathered from interviews with NGOs, government officials, and health care workers, the book argues that government and feminist NGO efforts to build trust in the health care system have fallen short because of systemic failures to protect women's rights and enhance the quality of health care. In Mexico a woman's risk of dying from a pregnancy-related complication is five times higher than in developed countries. The Limits of Trust explores the realities of implementing maternal health initiatives on the ground in rural, remote, and impoverished areas, and the steps that can be taken to successfully combat maternal mortality.

Hardback
£91.00
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Published November, 2017
By Kristi Heather Kenyon
Publisher: McGill-Queen's University Press
Rating:

in-stock
HIV represents not only an unprecedented pandemic but also a site of civil society innovation. In the midst of devastation, activists in sub-Saharan Africa are progressing from traditional forms of advocacy to strategies that engage human rights principles, techniques, and language. Employing a comparative case-study approach, Resilience and Contagion considers the efforts of nine local civil society organizations in Ghana, Uganda, South Africa, and Botswana. Kristi Heather Kenyon examines who adopts rights-based discourse and why, arguing that leadership, individual beliefs, and structure all play a critical role in framing organizations. Beyond changing laws or policies, the most important impact of promoting patients' rights, she attests, is that it enables individuals living with HIV to interact with health services from a position of resilience, strength, and empowerment. This book delves into discourse at the juncture of human rights, social theory, and global health, prompting significant and relevant discussion on advocacy's evolution in the region of the world hit hardest by the HIV pandemic. Drawing on 145 interviews, extensive participant observation, and fascinating document analysis, Resilience and Contagion foregrounds the voices of civil society actors who have conducted the most vocal, widespread, and innovative advocacy to date.

Hardback
£91.00
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Published November, 2017
By Kristi Heather Kenyon
Publisher: McGill-Queen's University Press
Rating:

in-stock
HIV represents not only an unprecedented pandemic but also a site of civil society innovation. In the midst of devastation, activists in sub-Saharan Africa are progressing from traditional forms of advocacy to strategies that engage human rights principles, techniques, and language. Employing a comparative case-study approach, Resilience and Contagion considers the efforts of nine local civil society organizations in Ghana, Uganda, South Africa, and Botswana. Kristi Heather Kenyon examines who adopts rights-based discourse and why, arguing that leadership, individual beliefs, and structure all play a critical role in framing organizations. Beyond changing laws or policies, the most important impact of promoting patients' rights, she attests, is that it enables individuals living with HIV to interact with health services from a position of resilience, strength, and empowerment. This book delves into discourse at the juncture of human rights, social theory, and global health, prompting significant and relevant discussion on advocacy's evolution in the region of the world hit hardest by the HIV pandemic. Drawing on 145 interviews, extensive participant observation, and fascinating document analysis, Resilience and Contagion foregrounds the voices of civil society actors who have conducted the most vocal, widespread, and innovative advocacy to date.

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£28.99
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Published October, 2017
By Julie Barlow, Pierre Pluye and Roland Grad
Publisher: McGill-Queen's University Press
Rating:

in-stock
Doctors Pierre Pluye and Roland Grad, internationally recognized experts in the fields of knowledge translation and health information studies, along with bestselling author and journalist Julie Barlow, take readers behind the scenes to show how online information is affecting self-care and primary health care in medicine, nursing, and pharmacy. Based on fifteen years of in-depth interviews and research, Look It Up! provides essential tips for patients and clinicians to administer and receive the best possible primary health care, while avoiding the perils of unguided self-diagnosis. This book shows how, by dint of an inquiring mind and a smartphone, rapid and accurate acquisition of knowledge keeps primary care clinicians up to date. It also shows how people can determine whether a test is more beneficial than harmful, and how information helps resolve disagreements and improve collaboration with patients and families, and among doctors, pharmacists, and nurses. In the age of easily accessible online information, clinicians have to think differently about how they work. Organized around numerous real clinical stories, Look It Up! is an illuminating and lively guide to improving patient care.

Hardback
£24.99
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Published August, 2017
By Richard LeBlanc
Publisher: McGill-Queen's University Press
Rating:

in-stock
Paul Broca made the most significant discovery in nineteenth-century human biology when he found that speech resides within the left frontal lobe of the human brain. As a young surgeon working at the hospice at Bicetre on the outskirts of Paris - a repository for the criminal, the insane, the indigent, and the sick - Broca had to overcome derision, acrimony, personal attacks, vindictiveness, and prevailing doctrines before his findings were accepted. Based on a new reading and translation of original records by Broca, Jean-Baptiste Bouillaud, and Gustave Dax, Fearful Asymmetry recounts the story of this hard-won scientific discovery. Richard Leblanc describes the contentious process, beginning with Bouillaud, who laid the groundwork for the findings, that led Broca on the trail of discovery as he struggled to bring forward a fundamental truth of neurology and, ultimately, of the human condition. Finally, Leblanc connects the research of the three French scientists to the work of Wilder Penfield at the Montreal Neurological Institute in the twentieth century, when neurology moved beyond postmortem anatomical studies to direct observations of the conscious brain. Making many of the debates about localization available for the first time in English, Fearful Asymmetry provides a detailed account of one critical scientific success and the long history behind it.

Hardback
£33.00
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Published May, 2017
By Adam Montgomery
Publisher: McGill-Queen's University Press
Rating:

in-stock
Canadian soldiers returning home have always been changed by war and peacekeeping, frequently in harmful but unseen ways. The Invisible Injured explores the Canadian military's continuous battle with psychological trauma from 1914 to 2014 to show that while public understanding and sympathy toward affected soldiers has increased, myths and stigmas have remained constant. Whether afflicted with shell shock, battle exhaustion, or post-traumatic stress disorder, Canadian troops were at the mercy of a military culture that promoted stoic and manly behavior while shunning weakness and vulnerability. Those who admitted to mental difficulties were often ostracized, released from the military, and denied a pension. Through interviews with veterans and close examination of accounts and records on the First World War, the Second World War, and post-Cold War peacekeeping missions, Adam Montgomery outlines the intimate links between the military, psychiatrists, politicians, and the Canadian public. He demonstrates that Canadians' views of trauma developed alongside the nation's changing role on the international stage - from warrior nation to peacekeeper. While Canadians took pride in their military's accomplishments around the globe, soldiers who came back haunted by their experiences were often ignored. Utilizing a wide range of historical sources and a frank approach, The Invisible Injured is the first book-length history of trauma in the Canadian military over the past century. It is a timely and provocative study that points to past mistakes and outlines new ideas of courage and determination.

Hardback
£28.99
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Published May, 2017
By Pat Armstrong, Professor of Sociology Pat Armstrong and Suzanne Day
Publisher: McGill-Queen's University Press
Rating:

in-stock
How clothing and laundry provide a window on to the structuring of care and work in nursing homes.

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£25.99
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Published May, 2017
By Pat Armstrong, Professor of Sociology Pat Armstrong and Suzanne Day
Publisher: McGill-Queen's University Press
Rating:

in-stock
How clothing and laundry provide a window on to the structuring of care and work in nursing homes.

Hardback
£86.00
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Published March, 2017
By Sarah Glassford
Publisher: McGill-Queen's University Press
Rating:

in-stock
For more than a century the Canadian Red Cross Society has provided help and comfort to vulnerable people at home and abroad. In the first detailed national history of the organization, Sarah Glassford reveals how the European-born Red Cross movement came to Canada and took root, and why it flourished. From its origins in battlefield medicine to the creation of Canada's first nationwide free blood transfusion service during the Cold War, Mobilizing Mercy charts crucial organizational changes, the influence of key leaders, and the impact of social, cultural, political, economic, and international trends over time. Glassford shows that the key to the Red Cross's longevity lies in its ability to reinvent itself by tapping into the concerns and ambitions of diverse groups including militia doctors, government officials, middle-class women, and schoolchildren. Through periods of war and peace, the Canadian Red Cross pioneered new services and filled gaps in government aid to become a ubiquitous agency on the wartime home front, a major domestic public health organization, and a respected provider of international humanitarian aid. Opening a window onto the shifting relationship between voluntary organizations and the state, Mobilizing Mercy is a compelling portrait of a major humanitarian organization, its people, and its ever-evolving place in Canadian society.

Hardback
£33.00
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