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Paleoanthropology and Archaeology of Big-Game Hunting
Protein, Fat, or Politics?
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Main description:

Since its inception, paleoanthropology has been closely wedded to the idea that big-game hunting by our hominin ancestors arose, first and foremost, as a means for acquiring energy and vital nutrients. This assumption has rarely been questioned, and seems intuitively obvious—meat is a nutrient-rich food with the ideal array of amino acids, and big animals provide meat in large, convenient packages. Through new research, the author of this volume provides a strong argument that the primary goals of big-game hunting were actually social and political—increasing hunter’s prestige and standing—and that the nutritional component was just an added bonus.

Through a comprehensive, interdisciplinary research approach, the author examines the historical and current perceptions of protein as an important nutrient source, the biological impact of a high-protein diet and the evidence of this in the archaeological record, and provides a compelling reexamination of this long-held conclusion.

This volume will be of interest to researchers in Archaeology, Evolutionary Biology, and Paleoanthropology, particularly those studying diet and nutrition.


Feature:

Comprehensive, multifaceted explanation of human nutrition and evolutionary needs

Synthesizes increasing number of arguments against the prevailing theories of big-game hunting

Provides a new explanation for a human adaptations


Back cover:

Since its inception, paleoanthropology has been closely wedded to the idea that big-game hunting by our hominin ancestors arose, first and foremost, as a means for acquiring energy and vital nutrients. This assumption has rarely been questioned, and seems intuitively obvious—meat is a nutrient-rich food with the ideal array of amino acids, and big animals provide meat in large, convenient packages.

Through new research, the author of this volume provides a strong argument that the primary goals of big-game hunting were actually social and political—increasing hunter’s prestige and standing—and that the nutritional component was just an added bonus.

Through a comprehensive, interdisciplinary research approach, the author examines the historical and current perceptions of protein as an important nutrient source, the biological impact of a high-protein diet and the evidence of this in the archaeological record, and provides a compelling reexamination of this long-held conclusion.

This volume will be of interest to researchers in Archaeology, Evolutionary Biology, and Paleoanthropology, particularly those studying diet and nutrition.


Contents:

How Do We Reconstruct Hunting Patterns in the Past?.- Big-Game Hunting in Human Evolution: The Traditional View.- The Other Side of Protein.- Were Big-Game Hunters Targeting Fat?.- Protein and Pregnancy.- Other Problems with High-Protein Intakes.- Protein and Taste.- Protein and Breast Milk.- Fat in Infancy.- DHA and the Developing Brain.- Big-Game Hunting: Protein, Fat, or Politics?.


PRODUCT DETAILS

ISBN-13: 9781441967336
Publisher: Springer (Springer New York)
Publication date: September, 2010
Pages: 325

Subcategories: Biochemistry