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Forensic Psychologist's Report Writing Guide
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Main description:

The Forensic Psychologist's Reporting Writing Guide is the first book to provide both student trainees and practitioners with best practice guidance for one of the core skills of their role. Written and edited by an international range of experts from the UK, North America and Australasia, it provides clear advice on a range of assessments, from psychometric tests to personality functioning, and includes real-life examples to illustrate key points. Uniquely, the book also offers guidance on the range of different client groups that forensic psychologists work with across both civil and legal contexts, including juveniles, female clients, couples and those with cognitive impairments. From core principles to writing style to key issues, each chapter also includes a checklist of advice and further reading. Comprehensive and practical, The Forensic Psychologist's Reporting Writing Guide is a user-friendly companion to this critical and often overlooked skill, and will be essential reading for both neophyte and experienced forensic psychologists alike.


Contents:

Introduction Erica Bowen, Coventry University, Coventry, UK Section 1: general issues of reporting across different types of assessments * Brief overview/introduction David Prescott, Becket Family of Services in the USA Chapter 1: Reporting psychometric tests Glenda Liell, NOMS, UK and Martin Fisher Consultant and Forensic Psychologist, NOMS, UK, Portsmouth University, UK & Southern Health NHS Foundation Trust, UK Chapter 2: Reporting intellectual capacity/cognitive functioning Robin Wilson, Wilson Psychological Services, Sarasota, Florida and David Tobin, Centre for Integrative Psychological Services, New Hampshire and Greenfield, Massachusetts, USA Chapter 3: Reporting actuarial risk Professor Martin Rettenberger, Centre for Criminology, Wiesbaden and Department of Psychology, Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz (JGU), Germany, and Professor Leam Craig, Forensic Psychology Practice Ltd, University of Birmingham, School of Social Sciences, Birmingham City University UK Chapter 4: Reporting case formulation and opinion Professor Andrew Day, Deakin University, Australia Chapter 5: Reporting structured professional judgement Caroline Logan, Greater Manchester West Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust & University of Manchester, UK Chapter 6: Reporting personality functioning Caroline Logan, Greater Manchester West Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust & University of Manchester, UK and Margaret Fenton, Greater Manchester West Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust, UK Chapter 7: Reporting change Professor Devon Polaschek, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand Section 2: considerations when reporting on specific client groups * Brief overview/introduction David Prescott, Becket Family of Services in the USA Chapter 8: Reporting on juvenile clients Dr. Clare-Ann Fortune, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand Chapter 9: Reporting on female clients Susan Cooper, Tees, Esk and Wear Valleys NHS Foundation Trust, UK and Kelley Blanchette, Correctional Service Canada Chapter 10: Reporting on vulnerable clients including those with cognitive impairments Robin Wilson, Wilson Psychological Services, Sarasota, Florida, USA; Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario and Brandie Stevenson, Pryor, Linder & Associates, Safe Management Group, Oakville, Ontario, Canada Chapter 11: Reporting on relationships, e.g. parenting competence, couples' assessments Wendy Morgan, London Metropolitan University, UK and Erica Bowen, Coventry University, UK Section 3: considerations when reporting in specific contexts * Brief overview/introduction David Prescott, Becket Family of Services in the USA Chapter 12: Reporting in secure settings, e.g. prisons, forensic hospitals Martin Fisher, NOMS, UK, Southern Health Foundation NHS Trust, UK; Dr Kerry Beckley, NOMS, UK; & Dr Jo Bailey, NOMS, UK Chapter 13: Reporting for parole or other hearings, e.g. mental health tribunals Professor Michael Daffern, Centre for Forensic Behavioural Science, Swinburne University of Technology; Dr. Jessica Mooney, Youth Health and Rehabilitation Service, Caraniche; Dr. Kylie Thomson, Centre for Forensic Behavioural Science, Swinburne University of Technology; & Ms. Gabrielle Klepfisz, Centre for Forensic Behavioural Science, Swinburne University of Technology; Australia Chapter 14: Reporting for community contexts, e.g. probation, community-based programmes/organisations Lawrence Ellerby & David Kolton, Forensic Psychological Services, Ellerby, Kolton, Rothman & Associates, Canada Appendix 1: Example Report 1 Appendix 2: Example Report 2 Appendix 3: Example Report 3


PRODUCT DETAILS

ISBN-13: 9781317554127
Publisher: Taylor & Francis (Routledge)
Publication date: May, 2017
Pages: 272

Subcategories: Forensics, Psychiatry